SkySafe bombards unauthorized drones with radio waves to wirelessly bring them down

SkySafe bombards unauthorized drones with radio waves to wirelessly bring them down

As drone technology quickly gains popularity, the tools designed to keep order in the remote-controlled skies are racing to keep up. One of the latest such contraptions, dubbed SkySafe, uses a targeted burst of radio signals to bring unauthorized drones to the ground before any damage can be done. The company claims to have created the first effective tool so far that will help keep unwanted drones out of dangerous situations. With a team of MIT engineers and military minds powering its product, SkySafe takes drone safety very seriously.

SkySafe is a complete drone detection system, not just the knock-out technology that grounds unwanted UAVs. Through a network of nodes covering a designated “SkySafe” area, the system can detect and locate drones, and track them if they are only approaching private airspace without actually crossing the line. If an unauthorized or unidentified drone does fly into the danger zone, the SkySafe tech grounds the drone immediately. While SkySafe does admit that they use radio frequency emissions to ground the drones, the company is keeping many of the system specifics under wraps.

Since SkySafe did just receive a fairly public investment from Andreessen Horowitz, the secrecy isn’t much of a surprise. “We support the entire drone community. We want everyone who’s operating drones in a safe manner to be able to utilize them to their fullest potential and we’re going to do everything we can to make that future a reality,” reads a recent SkySafe blog post. And since the near future may see fleets of properly authorized drones flying in sensitive airspace, SkySafe says that in addition to grounding unwanted craft, the system will be able to identify and recognize drones that have been cleared for flight.

The company hasn’t landed any big contracts quite yet, but it’s probabbly safe to assume that SkySafe will be working with large companies and organizations looking to protect their privately-owned airspace – think Hollywood movie sets, Silicon Valley campuses, and safety-concerned airports. Until the airspace is clear of pesky toys that endanger larger aircraft, it seems that the race to build anti-drone technology will continue.

 

[Digital Trends]

May 1, 2016 / by / in , , , , , , , , ,

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