Investor search mistakes to avoid, part 1

Investor search mistakes to avoid, part 1

CapitalMarketsMain

 

Small business capital comes from three primary sources:

  1. Profits left in the business;
  2. Debt, like a bank loan;
  3. Equity investment.

For most small businesses the third source is, and has been the founder’s investment.

In recent years, this option has become more robust and multi-faceted in the form of outside investors, whether venture capital, angel investors, and even with crowdfunding. The challenge is developing a capitalization strategy that matches the right sources with the short and long-term goals of the founder.

It must be said that while many elements of finding and acquiring investor capital are similar to getting a bank loan, the former takes longer and is more complex. In his book Raising Capital, Andrew Sherman addresses this issue with a list of common mistakes entrepreneurs make searching for investor capital . This is the first of two articles where I’ll identify Sherman’s “mistakes” and follow each one with my thoughts.

Mistake: Using an investor search that’s too broad.
Each investor has an interest and related strategy. An investor that likes medical ventures won’t be a prospect for your retail idea. Qualify each investor prospect before making contact.

Mistake:  Misjudging the time involved.
Part of Murphy’s Law states that everything will take longer than you think.  Alas, Mr. Murphy is alive and well in the investment marketplace. It usually takes months, not weeks, to find, approach, and get an answer from investors. Even crowdfunding will take more time than you think. And remember, like prayers, sometimes the answer is “no.”

Mistake: Falling in love with your business plan.
Every mother’s baby is beautiful.  But your plan is not your investor prospect’s baby. Expect that your business plan will have to be adjusted before you get funded. So be prepared to accept that changes will come with the capital.

Mistake: Taking financial projections too seriously.
First let’s establish the prime financial rule: All projections are wrong! Of course, you can show projections you believe are achievable. But also include a conservative set that shows your break-even point if things don’t go as planned.

Mistake: Confusing product development with sales.
Investors love real customers and real sales. Even sales projections based on history will be highly scrutinized. But projections based on projected sales will be highly doubted.

Mistake:  Minimizing the management team.
A good management team can fix a bad plan, but a bad team can ruin a good one. Unless you’re asking investors to contribute management expertise, don’t seek investor capital without a qualified management team .

 

[Forbes]

April 29, 2016 / by / in , , , ,

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